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reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
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reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine chefmo@chopstixhouston.com
Chef Mo is an internationally traveling retired chef from Hong Kong, China. His many experiences in life has given him plenty of metaphors to cooking. He specializes in Chinese dishes, but he also prepares dishes from other cultures as well. Chef Mo resides with his wife, lovely daughter and loyal dog in Hong Kong.
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine Youth can be a turbulent time for a person. When you are young, you are full of energy but without the wisdom to benefit it. The experience is frustrating because it is difficult to be calm and see it in a clean glass. My daughter was an example of this. Over ten years ago, when she was a teenager, it was difficult to instill my vision for her as a parent. I commanded her to be home before 8 o'clock at night, to minimize her enjoyment for rubbish music and most of all, I did not want her losing focus on her studies for the interest of boys. Of course, she did not listen and endured the undiscipline and emotions for youth. How hard it must have been for her at the time, she must have wanted to study and be obedient but could not control her desire for petty things like dating and pop music (that Aaron Kwok was such a mischievous rascal). Yet, I recall another youth who became even more lost in his own struggle for restraint and cultivation: myself.

It has been many decades since I have told this story. In my own adolescence, I have shamefully fallen into a lapse of judgment once. At the time I had recently met two new friends, Shan Wei and Little Lee. Both of them had been friends for a long time, and both of them enjoyed getting into trouble. Although I knew better, I could not control myself into following them. One holiday weekend, they convinced me to lie to my parents and tell them I had gone to a field trip with my university professors and peers. Shan Wei planned to go to Macau, which was a very unhealthy place. Macau is a Portuguese territory just south of Hong Kong, and it was well-known for its gambling and disco.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

On our first night, Shan Wei and Little Lee decided on one of their casinos. The heavy smell of smoke instantly made me cough and very nauseous. Little Lee convinced me to try my luck at the roulette tables. I did not realize soon enough until reflection that they did not play and only watched me spend my money. Whenever I won just a little bit, they insisted as friends we split our winnings three ways. Eager to please them, I paid for their dinner and even our stay at the hotel. Shan Wei burned through cigarettes one after another at the casino and later throughout the trip. I had not realized he was such a chain smoker until then. He offered me to try, but thankfully, I had the common sense to say no.

The worst part of the trip, I still remember, was when we went to a "gentleman's club".

At first, I was skeptical about why it looked suspicious with neon lights and its dark shades. I had imagined a gentlemen's club to be like on the Western television movies, filled with British men and upper class discussion on the latest politics. Instead, I noticed no gentlemen, but uncouthed males entering a disco music hallway. Shan Wei and Little Lee shook in excitement the moment we walked in. I immediately knew this was a very bad place. I yelled in horror the moment I saw two women walking around without a shirt on. I feared for my life. Shan Wei and Little Lee started flirting with other shirtless women. I was too scared to do anything. When a clothesless Macau woman approached me and touched my buttocks, I immediately ran out of the gentlemen's club.

Macau is not for me. There are good, but far too much disturbance for a healthy person. And yet, sometimes, when I cook, I have to make a dish that is a little improper and sinful. For this example, I have decided to choose the White Wine Cod Stew in today's lesson. Why is the this dish not my favorite? For one, it is fattening. But the other is that it breaks a moral barrier for cooking with alcohol. Although you cannot get drunk, even some exposure to some can eventually leave to addiction. This dish is famously Macau, and I cook it well, but it must be eaten in regulation.

Enjoy the lesson, then we will finish the story.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

1. PREPARING THE COD

  • Cod Fish

In Macanese cooking, seafood is everything. Not only because the location is close to the sea, but because Portguese influences are heavy on seafood cooking. For this dish, we cannot use any other type of fish as substitution. The choice of a cod is the reason this particular dish tastes the way it does. Any other choice would be changing the structure of the taste.

So, we use rince the cod fish for around 2-4 minutes. You will need an oven for this, as we are going to place the cod into a souffle dish sealed shut with a lid, which we will put at a 650 watt oven for 100 in 6-8 minutes. After this time, we will remove from the over and uncover to rinse with cold water another 3 minutes. Repeat this back to the oven two more times.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

2. SETTING UP THE POTATOES

  • Potatoes
  • Olive Oil
  • Garlic

Penetrate each potato with a knife and then power towel each piece, then dip them with oil and garlic pieces. Cook each towel protected potato at 100% power in a 650 watt microwave for 11 minutes. Once done, remove from the oven and let the pieces cool.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

3. ADDING IN THE REST

  • White wine
  • Plum tomatoes
  • Black olives
  • Bay leaf
  • Thyme
  • Sugar
  • Black pepper
  • Golden raisins
  • Pine nuts

Once the cod fish and the potatoes are heated from oven and properly prepared. Insert in some chopped plum tomatoes, olives, bay leaves, thyme, black olives, pepper and sugar. Most controversial of all, introduce the dish with the white wine. It brings out the flavor but it also places some alcohol in it. Always remember to never DRINK while COOKING. We can use wine this time, it's okay. But remember the white wine is for the cooking. If you are drunk, please be careful as you are close to the fire and could very well get very hurt. Drinking is dangerous.

Now put everything into one dish that can be sealable with a lid and cook at 100% power for up to 10 minutes.

Once that is done, remove from oven and garnish with raisins, black pepper and pine nuts.

There, you now have the White Wine Cod Stew.

Enjoy, but be responsible.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

I waited for two hours for Shan Wei and Little Lee to come out of the gentlemen's club. They did not. When I arrived back into my hotel room, I was alone and began to be upset. I had wished I was back in Hong Kong with my classmates, hiking or biking. My disappointment in myself brought me to sleep. When I woke up the next morning, many things were gone including my wallet. Since I noticed Shan Wei and Little Lee's bags had disappeared, I've concluded that they had committed robbery of me. Heartbroken from a false friendship, I made my way back to the Hong Kong ferry and paid for it with begged loose change.

This lapse of judgment happened because I was young. I could not control what I felt and went against my instincts. I am now glad to be old and wise. I wish I could have been here quicker. It is no fun to be young with so much confusion about right or wrong. I tell my daughter, but she did not believe me until these last few years. When an adult tells a child things, the child must absolutely listen! The adult serves as the eyes and leads the blinded youth toward a life of contentment through discipline and worthiness. If I had listened to my elders, I would not have gone to Macau and smothered my eyes with a gentlemen's club and gotten robbed! Such is the suffering of youth, but we must all find that day, when we are wiser and less fallen to the tricks of temptation.


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reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine - 1 pound cod fish
- 2 (8 ounce) baking potatoes, scrubbed
- 12 cups cold water
- 1/4 cup olive oil
- 5 garlic cloves
- 1 (28 ounce) can of plum tomatoes
- 3/4 cup black olives
- 1/2 cup white wine
- 1 bay leaf
- 1 sprig fresh thyme
- A pinch of sugar
- Black pepper
- 1/3 cup golden raisins
- 2 tablespoons pine nuts
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
A Sinful Dish
While sneaking to the nightlife of Macau in his young teenage days, Chef Mo encountered the fast life of casinos and gentlemen's club. He ties this in with a famous Macau dish called White Wine Cod Fish. Chef Mo warns against the dangers of alcohol.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Simple Kung Pao Chicken
Chef Mo talks about the his childhood visiting rural villages in Mainland China and how it ties in to his lesson in the famous dish Kung Pao Chicken. Learn how to make Kung Pao Chicken by reading this article! It's another classic Chef Mo tale.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Sweet Mango Pudding
Chef Mo recalls the days as a principal of a primary school in Hong Kong. He dedicates the recipe for a sweet mango pudding dessert to an exceptional student. What does one have to relate to another? Read more to find out.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Challenge of Unagi Don
The journey where Chef Mo obtains a black belt in Japan began with an interest of conquering his own fears. By accepting challenges, Chef Mo tackles on a difficult task: creating unagi don from scratch!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Duck and My Dog
Chef Mo's best friend is his dog, Xing Xing. For Xing Xing's special occasion, he prepares a dish with the dog's favorite meat: duck! Chef Mo shows you how to make Braised Duck with Ginger and Plum Sauce!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
An Indian Chinese Twist
Curry is a big part of Hong Kong culture even though its from India. Chef Mo recalls a young Indian colleague who was also distinctively a fabric of Hong Kong culture...

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Making Dumplings and Hope
Dumplings are a staple in Chinese cuisine. They are eaten for food as well as for luck. Though the symbolize prosperity, in ancient days they were a symbol for hope. Chef Mo discusses how hope is important in his life and why it may be the most powerful force.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
A Pineapple Boat Love Story
The year was 1967. Chef Mo was skinny, 16-years-old and a man in love. But he also had a rival named Kelvin. Read about the origins of Chef Mo and how he first develped interest in cooking. His suggestion for Pineapple Boat Fried Rice dish is a love potion he can share with all generations!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Buddah's New Year Delight
The vegetarian dish Buddah's Delight is important in symbolism for Chinese New Year's. Each ingredient represents an aspect of good fortune. Together, they create a dish full of purity and meaning. It's also extremely healthy, light, and full of fiber.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Passion of Sweet and Sour Pork
Chef Mo declares the secret to a woman's heart is not with roses, but with food. After a brief argument with his wife, he decides to head to the Hong Kong street markets to make her their favorite dish, Sweet and Sour Pork.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Holiday Hot Pot!
Holidays are the best time for hot pot, a very popular activity in Asian culture. Let Chef Mo recommend to you some home hot pot activities and a personal story which hot pot reminds him of!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Pepper Steaks Made Easy
Pepper Steak is one classic traditional dish that is both delicious and easy to cook. Chef Mo explains it is so easy that people often complicate things.

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