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reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
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reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
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reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine chefmo@chopstixhouston.com
Chef Mo is an internationally traveling retired chef from Hong Kong, China. His many experiences in life has given him plenty of metaphors to cooking. He specializes in Chinese dishes, but he also prepares dishes from other cultures as well. Chef Mo resides with his wife, lovely daughter and loyal dog in Hong Kong.
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine When my good friend Chin offered me the opportunity to take over his private elementary school in the mid-90's, I thought he was out of his mind. My career as a chef had started becoming a local sensation in Hong Kong and I was finally living my dream. Of course, even though private schools are a profitable venture in our marvelous city, I was never into doing things strictly for finances. I had no experience with education and children, and to be honest, I did not see myself as a disciplinarian. Cooking was something I liked because it made others happy.

My wife, however, had a different opinion.

Owning a school in Hong Kong was not just a method of business, she said, but an honor. With such a limited amount of private schools and the upcoming handout of power from Britain to China in 1997, Hong Kong would need to provide a strong education foundation for its new generation of children. Chin had an understandable life situation where he could no longer look after the elementary school, so I apologized for withhelding his invitation and decided to give running his school a try.

And so, for a couple of years, I temporarily retired as a gourmet chef and became an elementary school principle.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

For the first several weeks, my wife enjoyed the time at the school much more that I had. She loved the interaction between the children, because she was a natural with them. However, I did not enjoy such a feeling. Children were hesitant to approach me. I did not smile and they were afraid of my thick mustache. I yearned to go back to gourmet cooking where I felt useful and productive.

One day, as I was patrolling the hallways after the final school bell rang, I witnessed two boys pushing another boy. When they saw me approach, one of the bullying boys started to run away. I ordered him to stop and sternly lectured them. I gave them each a week of detention and called their parents. On the outside, I looked angry, but on the inside, I was shaking. Not even on my own daughter, had I tried much discipline. I was very clumsy on dealing with the assaulted boy, Wing, who was crying. As a youth, because I was well-liked, I was never bullied. So I could not say much words to comfort him.

Suddenly, I had an inspiration...we had an extra mango pudding left in my office. No doubt he has eaten many Chinese-styled mango, but it was the perfect timing that made Wing smile. Why did it make him smile? Because it made him forget. The mango pudding is a symbol of the present, it can be sweet when it makes you forget the past. Mango Pudding is a popular dim sum dessert and also in Chinese weddings. It is also eaten out of fun and enjoyed after any Chinese meal. For this article, I have chosen the Chinese Mango Pudding in honor of my dear little friend, Wing.

Let us begin the lesson...

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

1. PREPARING THE GELETIN AND MANGOS

  • Mangos
  • Packages of gelatin

In a bowl, stir the geletin powder with a 1/2 cup of water. Stir until they become one entity. This shouldn't take much effort and is very easy to do. Then, take the two mangos and cut them into little pieces, of course, minus the skin. If you are used to cutting mangos, you know what I am talking about.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

2. BOIL THEM TOGETHER

  • Sugar
  • Half and half cream milk
  • Mango juice

With a small pan filled with a 1/2 cup of water, put over a small flame to boil the water. Once the water is boiling, insert the sugar. Dissolve the sugar and add the geletin mix from Step 1 as well as the mango pieces. A few seconds later, include the mango juice and half and half milk. If you do it right, it should flow together very smoothly. Stir them all together while continously boiling. When they are together, you can turn off the fire and pour the contents into a bowl for refrigeration.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

3. REFRIGERATING AND SERVING

  • Regular milk
  • Cherry

From the boiled contents now in a new bowl, put the bowl into your refrigerator. Leave overnight with the top of the bowl covered in a plastic syran wrap. When you serve the next day, use a scoop and serve up to 5 seperate small cups. Slightly pour some condensed regular milk and add a cherry in the middle for presentation!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

Years have passed and it was time for my wife and I to move on. We sold the school and enjoyed the memories we had with the schoolchildren. I had since learned to be comfortable with them and easily became the beloved Principal Mo. When Principal Mo became Chef Mo again, some of my former students came and found me. One day, a really large and muscular young man approached me and asked "Principal Mo! What happened to your thick mustache?"

Even though he was not the skinny child anymore, the eyes have not changed and the smile have not changed. "Wing! You are a big boy now! How are you?" I laughed. Wing informed me he was a fitness gym owner. He works on self-image and self-esteem. I asked him what was the best advice? "Think of the good things about today and tomorrow and let the past be the past. Remember the mango pudding you gave me in your office that day I got bullied?" asked Wang. I told him of course and in celebration, served him some mango pudding from my restaurant. The present, it turns out, is still sweet.


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reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine - 2 mangos
- 2 packages of gelatin
- 1/2 cup of sugar
- 1/2 cup of half and half cream milk
- 3 cups of mango juice
- 1 cup of regular milk
- 5 cherries
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
A Sinful Dish
While sneaking to the nightlife of Macau in his young teenage days, Chef Mo encountered the fast life of casinos and gentlemen's club. He ties this in with a famous Macau dish called White Wine Cod Fish. Chef Mo warns against the dangers of alcohol.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Simple Kung Pao Chicken
Chef Mo talks about the his childhood visiting rural villages in Mainland China and how it ties in to his lesson in the famous dish Kung Pao Chicken. Learn how to make Kung Pao Chicken by reading this article! It's another classic Chef Mo tale.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Sweet Mango Pudding
Chef Mo recalls the days as a principal of a primary school in Hong Kong. He dedicates the recipe for a sweet mango pudding dessert to an exceptional student. What does one have to relate to another? Read more to find out.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Challenge of Unagi Don
The journey where Chef Mo obtains a black belt in Japan began with an interest of conquering his own fears. By accepting challenges, Chef Mo tackles on a difficult task: creating unagi don from scratch!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Duck and My Dog
Chef Mo's best friend is his dog, Xing Xing. For Xing Xing's special occasion, he prepares a dish with the dog's favorite meat: duck! Chef Mo shows you how to make Braised Duck with Ginger and Plum Sauce!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
An Indian Chinese Twist
Curry is a big part of Hong Kong culture even though its from India. Chef Mo recalls a young Indian colleague who was also distinctively a fabric of Hong Kong culture...

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Making Dumplings and Hope
Dumplings are a staple in Chinese cuisine. They are eaten for food as well as for luck. Though the symbolize prosperity, in ancient days they were a symbol for hope. Chef Mo discusses how hope is important in his life and why it may be the most powerful force.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
A Pineapple Boat Love Story
The year was 1967. Chef Mo was skinny, 16-years-old and a man in love. But he also had a rival named Kelvin. Read about the origins of Chef Mo and how he first develped interest in cooking. His suggestion for Pineapple Boat Fried Rice dish is a love potion he can share with all generations!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Buddah's New Year Delight
The vegetarian dish Buddah's Delight is important in symbolism for Chinese New Year's. Each ingredient represents an aspect of good fortune. Together, they create a dish full of purity and meaning. It's also extremely healthy, light, and full of fiber.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Passion of Sweet and Sour Pork
Chef Mo declares the secret to a woman's heart is not with roses, but with food. After a brief argument with his wife, he decides to head to the Hong Kong street markets to make her their favorite dish, Sweet and Sour Pork.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Holiday Hot Pot!
Holidays are the best time for hot pot, a very popular activity in Asian culture. Let Chef Mo recommend to you some home hot pot activities and a personal story which hot pot reminds him of!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Pepper Steaks Made Easy
Pepper Steak is one classic traditional dish that is both delicious and easy to cook. Chef Mo explains it is so easy that people often complicate things.

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