reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Likes: 230 Dislikes: 7
 
 

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine chefmo@chopstixhouston.com
Chef Mo is an internationally traveling retired chef from Hong Kong, China. His many experiences in life has given him plenty of metaphors to cooking. He specializes in Chinese dishes, but he also prepares dishes from other cultures as well. Chef Mo resides with his wife, lovely daughter and loyal dog in Hong Kong.
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine Whenever I meet a foreigner, especially a Western one, they will ask me, "Chef Mo, where are you from?" I will tell them that I come from Hong Kong. Then they usually answer that I am from China, and I correct them by saying "yes, but I am from Hong Kong". What does this mean? Let me refer to you a childhood story about my visit to the Mainland countryside where I visited my extended family. As a child, I was used to the city life. Hong Kong was an accomplished city and a world apart from the backwards civilization of the Mainland countryside. It was with great annoyance whenever my mother took me to visit her original village for a weekend. The people were different, the words they used were out-of-touch and they knew so little about technology. I was even annoyed that the village my extended relatives lived in shared only one phone for the entire town.

My cousins from rural China enjoyed a game chasing chickens. I did not join them because I was afraid I would be stepping on chicken and other animal feces. Since I enjoyed peace, I tended to feed the chickens for fun instead of chasing them. There was one particular chicken I grew fond with and I named it Snow. Snow was a special shade of white, which was very rare and beautiful. Naturally, chickens are not beautiful creatures, but Snow was unique. She seemed very intelligent for a chicken.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

Of course, you may have guessed correctly that I noticed Snow to be gone one morning. In a moment of evil humor, we had a delicious chicken plate that same evening which I delighted more than others. When I asked what happened to Snow, my grandmother asked me who was Snow? "Oh, you mean the really bright white one? She is in your stomach, Mo Mo!" I suddenly cried, but it was too late. I had already digested Snow. For a few days, I was angry at my rural Mainland cousins for laughing at what happened. I swore I would never eat another chicken again. I sat in solitude, cursing them for being backwards and thinking them barbaric.

Not much later, I went back to eating chicken again. I suppose it was silly of me to be fond of a chicken. Today's lesson is about how to make the dish Kung Pao Chicken. Everybody knows what Kung Pao Chicken is, but I chose it because it represented the Chinese fondness for chicken, especially in rural areas. Kung Pao Chicken is originally a Sichuan dish, that is where the large amounts of spices and peanut garnishes come from. My childhood village is not near the Sichuan area, but the dish is popular enough to illustrate chicken's importance in all areas of China. So this is the Western-version of Kung Pao Chicken, because I know most of the audience is from the Western part of the world. The difference is in the marination, which is actually in our first step.

Let us begin our lesson...

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

1. MARINATE THE CHICKEN

  • Boneless chicken breast
  • Rice wine
  • Soy sauce
  • Oil
  • Cornstarch (water mixtured)

Cut the chicken breast into cube pieces with a medium-sized knife. Combine the wine, soy sauce, oil and a water mixture of cornstarch together. Place chicken pieces in a glass dish or bowl and let them marinade together. Toss them around to coat. Cover dish and place in refrigerator for about 30 minutes.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

2. CREATING THE SAUCE

  • White Wine
  • Soy sauce
  • Cornstarch (water mixtured)
  • Hot chili paste
  • White vinegar
  • Sugar

Now in a small bowl, combine white wine with the soy sauce, watered cornstarch, hot chili paste, white vinegar and some sugar. Heat together in a medium skillet until you can smell the sauce.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

3. COOKING TOGETHER WITH PEANUTS

  • Ingredients from Step 1
  • Ingredients from Step 2
  • Garlic
  • Green Onions
  • Peanuts

With some garlic, together now, put the marinaded chicken from Step 1 and cook in a large skillet until the chicken is white and the juices are clear. Add the sauce from Step 2 and simmer together until the sauce is thick. Near the end, cook together with green onions, peanuts and a little bit of sesame oil.

There. You are done. Please enjoy the rest of the story.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine

In my childhood, I carried with me a prejudice towards my rural Mainland Chinese cousins. Returning visits throughout the following years have brought me a different perspective on them. They live a harder life, but a simpler one in many ways. Being from Hong Kong, I haven't the insight of their experiences. That is why, when people ask me, I do not say I'm from China...I tell them I'm from Hong Kong.

I am glad to know that China is doing well now. Unfortunately, Hong Kong has fallen on tougher economic times. Though we are part of their country, our seperation has not shared in their fortunate destiny. I do not enjoy discussing politics, but I remember the simpler times when I used to visit my rural cousins in the mainland and befriended a chicken I named Snow. These days they are living a happy life, as have I, and for that, I am happy for all of us and embrace them without prejudice.


Share |



reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Subscriber or Reviewer Email:

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine



\"reviews
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine - Boneless chicken breast
- Rice wine
- Soy sauce
- Oil
- White Wine
- Soy sauce
- Cornstarch (water mixtured)
- Hot chili paste
- White vinegar
- Sugar
- Ingredients from Step 1
- Ingredients from Step 2
- Garlic
- Green Onions
- Peanuts
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
A Sinful Dish
While sneaking to the nightlife of Macau in his young teenage days, Chef Mo encountered the fast life of casinos and gentlemen's club. He ties this in with a famous Macau dish called White Wine Cod Fish. Chef Mo warns against the dangers of alcohol.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Simple Kung Pao Chicken
Chef Mo talks about the his childhood visiting rural villages in Mainland China and how it ties in to his lesson in the famous dish Kung Pao Chicken. Learn how to make Kung Pao Chicken by reading this article! It's another classic Chef Mo tale.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Sweet Mango Pudding
Chef Mo recalls the days as a principal of a primary school in Hong Kong. He dedicates the recipe for a sweet mango pudding dessert to an exceptional student. What does one have to relate to another? Read more to find out.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Challenge of Unagi Don
The journey where Chef Mo obtains a black belt in Japan began with an interest of conquering his own fears. By accepting challenges, Chef Mo tackles on a difficult task: creating unagi don from scratch!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Duck and My Dog
Chef Mo's best friend is his dog, Xing Xing. For Xing Xing's special occasion, he prepares a dish with the dog's favorite meat: duck! Chef Mo shows you how to make Braised Duck with Ginger and Plum Sauce!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
An Indian Chinese Twist
Curry is a big part of Hong Kong culture even though its from India. Chef Mo recalls a young Indian colleague who was also distinctively a fabric of Hong Kong culture...

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Making Dumplings and Hope
Dumplings are a staple in Chinese cuisine. They are eaten for food as well as for luck. Though the symbolize prosperity, in ancient days they were a symbol for hope. Chef Mo discusses how hope is important in his life and why it may be the most powerful force.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
A Pineapple Boat Love Story
The year was 1967. Chef Mo was skinny, 16-years-old and a man in love. But he also had a rival named Kelvin. Read about the origins of Chef Mo and how he first develped interest in cooking. His suggestion for Pineapple Boat Fried Rice dish is a love potion he can share with all generations!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Buddah's New Year Delight
The vegetarian dish Buddah's Delight is important in symbolism for Chinese New Year's. Each ingredient represents an aspect of good fortune. Together, they create a dish full of purity and meaning. It's also extremely healthy, light, and full of fiber.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Passion of Sweet and Sour Pork
Chef Mo declares the secret to a woman's heart is not with roses, but with food. After a brief argument with his wife, he decides to head to the Hong Kong street markets to make her their favorite dish, Sweet and Sour Pork.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Holiday Hot Pot!
Holidays are the best time for hot pot, a very popular activity in Asian culture. Let Chef Mo recommend to you some home hot pot activities and a personal story which hot pot reminds him of!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Pepper Steaks Made Easy
Pepper Steak is one classic traditional dish that is both delicious and easy to cook. Chef Mo explains it is so easy that people often complicate things.

2012 Chopstix Houston. All Rights Reserved.