reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Likes: 98 Dislikes: 5
 
 

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine chefmo@chopstixhouston.com
Chef Mo is an internationally traveling retired chef from Hong Kong, China. His many experiences in life has given him plenty of metaphors to cooking. He specializes in Chinese dishes, but he also prepares dishes from other cultures as well. Chef Mo resides with his wife, lovely daughter and loyal dog in Hong Kong.
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine The date was January 2010. That was when I looked at my daughter's Facebook and saw that she had a boyfriend. At first, I was just hoping they were classmates. Perhaps she needed help with her homework and that there were no other female classmates to help her with her studying. Then, when it became clear that they knew one another, I was hoping maybe he was just a male friend. But, of course, in Hong Kong a male friend means a boyfriend. I flipped through her Facebook photos and saw a photo of her which I will never forget: her head was leaning on his shoulder.

I could not breathe when I saw that. I almost fainted.

She was only 21, just a baby. I woke my wife up and said "put on your glasses. Look at this..." My wife yawned and replied that he was kind of handsome and went back to sleep. I glanced at the photo a half-hour longer and saw the future. This was going to be our daughter's husband, he would be the father of her child. Most importantly, what would my own father think of this? Would he approve? I'm not sure. The remainder of the night I was laying on my bed mostly thankful for Facebook because it allowed me to see everything. Facebook is a father's greatest help. If my daughter did drugs, smoked or had a boyfriend, anything crazy like that, I would know about it. These things, a father must know.

The next few weeks, there was a quiet tension in the house. I had trouble writing my cookbook and neglected to walk our dog. My wife complained I was being too serious. Finally, I couldn't take it anymore. It was the Chinese New Year weekend and it was time to settle it with hot pot. In Hong Kong, hot pot is very popular for family and friends. It is also a good time to introduce a new "fish" into our river. Our familiar family members and friends can see the stranger and later on, huddle together and compare our thoughts when they've left. I will tell you what happens at the end of this article, but first, let this be a good introduction to hot pot for the holiday season.

Now that it is the time of the year for celebration with family and friends, hot pot is a modern tradition in most Asian families whether it is East or West. It is fun, it involves participation, and it is easy to set up. Even though hot pot is technically not a cooking art, it is an appropriate subject to talk about at this time of year.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine


1. PROPER COOKWARE
To start, you should have a specialized hot pot or shabu shabu cookware. Many modern ones, gas-powered hotpots now are very affordable and create a good, almost instant flame that is cleaner and safer. If you have an old one from the 1980's, please go out and buy a modern one. The holidays are not a good time to be cheap and hazardous. Also important are enough small dishes

Checklist for cookware/silverware:

  • Gas-powered hot pot
  • Specialized hot pot ladles which have a "net" effect
  • One small bowl for mixing sauces per guest. Rice bowls are best.


reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine


2. SOUP BASE
The soup base create the hot pot. You can have just a normal broth like chicken, or you can add various ingredients like ginseng, red dates and rice wine. I also see a lot of "instant stocks" available in markets now, which work like flavoring to cup noodles. If you want real authenticity, please do not use those. They are also filled with a lot of MSG. My Korean colleague and good friend, Chef Hyun-Soo, recommends using kim chi as part of the soup base too. My wife likes to add mushroom to the base, but she is strange for doing this. If you have more young people, or just people who like spicy things, you can do it Sichuan style. Below are three popular options:
Regular Style:

  • Plain chicken broth
  • Boiling water
  • Chicken
  • 1/2 lb. of pork ribs
  • Green onions
  • White radish
  • 4-5 pieces of ginger.

Sichuan Style:

  • A flavorful broth
  • Boiling water
  • 2 tablespoons of peanut oil
  • 3-4 sichuan chili
  • 1 tablespoon of bean sauce
  • 10 Chinese mushrooms
  • 250 ml of chili oil
  • Chinese cabbage
  • A set of deep-fried tofu
  • Some peeled ginger root

Grandma/Healthy Style:

  • Plain vegetable broth
  • Boiling water
  • Corn
  • Carrots
  • Minimal ginger
  • Chinese cabbage

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine


3. SAUCE SELECTIONS
In hot pot, you leave out to your guests different ingredients and a small bowl for them to create their own sauces. They will simply put what they like and stir it together. This can either make the meal healthy or unhealthy. Do it at your own risk.

These sauces are:

  • 1 raw egg (I know a guy who put three raw eggs. He will surely die before turning 40)
  • Sesame oil
  • Sa Cha sauce
  • Hoisin sauce
  • Sesame butter
  • Soy sauce
  • Vinegar
  • White pepper
  • Black pepper
  • Garlic
  • In America, the addition of Tabasco sauce is also good
  • For a Thailand flavor, use pad thai sauce


reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine


4. COOKING ITEMS
Using specialized hot pot ladles, each guest can choose from various raw items to be placed inside their ladles and cooked in the hot pot. Even though I am Chinese, I like to use the Japanese sliced meats called sukiyaki. However, most Chinese people like to use the regular meat, pork, and chicken. You can find these in any market in the world whether you are in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Los Angeles, Sydney, whatever. Meat is meat.

However, because some people may be vegetarians or other reasons to avoid meat, you should always have two hot pots at your table to seperate them. Or, you can buy the divided hot pots, which seperates two different sides on the same hot pot.

Meat/Seafood items:

  • Beef
  • Sukiyaki beef
  • Pork
  • Pork balls
  • Chicken
  • Fish balls
  • Fish maw
  • Clams
  • Imitation crab sticks
  • Shrimp
  • Mussels
  • Whole Egg
  • Fish dumplings

Vegetable items:

  • Enoki Mushrooms
  • Bok choy
  • White radish
  • Abalone
  • Chinese cabbage [*Editor's Note: Napa Cabbage]
  • Tofu
  • Vegetable balls

Noodle items:

  • Udon
  • Tang hoon noodles


reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine


I made sure our family and friends came before my daughter's "friend" could arrive. When some of them said they couldn't make it that early, I desperately pleaded for them to find a way. My wife told me to calm down. At 5:30 Saturday, that Chinese New Year weekend, he came through the door and fifteen pairs of eyes immediately started analyzing him. My sister observed he was left-handed. My best friend noticed his face was not very symmetrical. Above all, he was already balding at such a young age. My side of the family has beautiful, healthy hair, but my daughter has my wife's genes, whose family is very bald. If my daughter and this thief produce a male child, I thought, that baby will never grow any hair. My father would never approve of this waste of good hair genes. This was strike one.

Strike two came when he professed he enjoyed Stephen Chow's movies. I hate Stephen's Chow's movies! They represent a childish-type of humor that is not suitable for adults. Now this guy is going to marry my daughter, probably not have a future and make Stephen Chow humor? What kind of grandchild can I expect from a man who does not take life seriously? My brother and I glanced at each other and quietly shook our heads when we knew of this.

We were ready for strike three, so near the end of the hot pot dinner, when most of the family were either relaxing on the sofa or singing karaoke, my wife and I had the opportunity to speak with Mr. Boyfriend with my daughter beside him. My wife took a liking to him that night, but I was not so easily fooled by his mere politeness and his stylish glasses. I finally asked him what he did for a job. I knew from his look that he was not an accountant, doctor, lawyer or even an architect. He was probably just a web designer or some low job like that. "I am a chef", he replied, then told me the name of the restaurant he works at. Almost immediately, I started liking him. But I still had to test him. "How do you make Salt Baked Squid?", "What is the best procedure to create the best Pork Blood Jello in a chive clay pot?", "How long do you sautee a lobster in X.O. sauce?" The young man not only showed master-level knowledge on how to cook these dishes, but he also said it in a way that involved wit, charm and humor in the form of truth. That night, I took my wife aside and told her he was the one.

Ever since that night, my daughter has been dating him for two years and going. She has small eyes and he has little hair, so I'm sure my male grandchild will be kind of ugly. Yet, the young man treats us really well with his cooking. I have learned to tolerate his love for Stephen Chow and allowed my daughter to hold his hand (but nothing more) on occasion. No matter how many times I have had hot pot since then, hot pot will always remind me of the first day I met my daughter's boyfriend.


Share |



reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Subscriber or Reviewer Email:

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine



\"reviews
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine Hot Pot
- Plain chicken broth
- Boiling water
- Chicken
- 1/2 lb. of pork ribs
- Green onions
- White radish
- 4-5 pieces of ginger
- 2 tablespoons of peanut oil
- 3-4 sichuan chili
- 1 tablespoon of bean sauce
- 10 Chinese mushrooms
- 250 ml of chili oil
- Chinese cabbage
- A set of deep-fried tofu
- Some peeled ginger root
- Corn
- Carrots
- Minimal ginger
- 1 raw egg
- Sesame oil
- Sa Cha sauce
- Hoisin sauce
- Sesame butter
- Soy sauce
- Vinegar
- White pepper
- Black pepper
- Garlic
- Beef
- Sukiyaki beef
- Pork
- Pork balls
- Chicken
- Fish balls
- Fish maw
- Clams
- Imitation crab sticks
- Shrimp
- Mussels
- Whole Egg
- Fish dumplings
- Enoki Mushrooms
- Bok choy
- White radish
- Abalone
- Tofu
- Vegetable balls
- Udon
- Tang hoon noodles
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
A Sinful Dish
While sneaking to the nightlife of Macau in his young teenage days, Chef Mo encountered the fast life of casinos and gentlemen's club. He ties this in with a famous Macau dish called White Wine Cod Fish. Chef Mo warns against the dangers of alcohol.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Simple Kung Pao Chicken
Chef Mo talks about the his childhood visiting rural villages in Mainland China and how it ties in to his lesson in the famous dish Kung Pao Chicken. Learn how to make Kung Pao Chicken by reading this article! It's another classic Chef Mo tale.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Sweet Mango Pudding
Chef Mo recalls the days as a principal of a primary school in Hong Kong. He dedicates the recipe for a sweet mango pudding dessert to an exceptional student. What does one have to relate to another? Read more to find out.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Challenge of Unagi Don
The journey where Chef Mo obtains a black belt in Japan began with an interest of conquering his own fears. By accepting challenges, Chef Mo tackles on a difficult task: creating unagi don from scratch!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Duck and My Dog
Chef Mo's best friend is his dog, Xing Xing. For Xing Xing's special occasion, he prepares a dish with the dog's favorite meat: duck! Chef Mo shows you how to make Braised Duck with Ginger and Plum Sauce!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
An Indian Chinese Twist
Curry is a big part of Hong Kong culture even though its from India. Chef Mo recalls a young Indian colleague who was also distinctively a fabric of Hong Kong culture...

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Making Dumplings and Hope
Dumplings are a staple in Chinese cuisine. They are eaten for food as well as for luck. Though the symbolize prosperity, in ancient days they were a symbol for hope. Chef Mo discusses how hope is important in his life and why it may be the most powerful force.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
A Pineapple Boat Love Story
The year was 1967. Chef Mo was skinny, 16-years-old and a man in love. But he also had a rival named Kelvin. Read about the origins of Chef Mo and how he first develped interest in cooking. His suggestion for Pineapple Boat Fried Rice dish is a love potion he can share with all generations!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Buddah's New Year Delight
The vegetarian dish Buddah's Delight is important in symbolism for Chinese New Year's. Each ingredient represents an aspect of good fortune. Together, they create a dish full of purity and meaning. It's also extremely healthy, light, and full of fiber.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
The Passion of Sweet and Sour Pork
Chef Mo declares the secret to a woman's heart is not with roses, but with food. After a brief argument with his wife, he decides to head to the Hong Kong street markets to make her their favorite dish, Sweet and Sour Pork.

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Holiday Hot Pot!
Holidays are the best time for hot pot, a very popular activity in Asian culture. Let Chef Mo recommend to you some home hot pot activities and a personal story which hot pot reminds him of!

reviews restaurants asian chopstix houston chinatown food foodie online magazine
Pepper Steaks Made Easy
Pepper Steak is one classic traditional dish that is both delicious and easy to cook. Chef Mo explains it is so easy that people often complicate things.

2012 Chopstix Houston. All Rights Reserved.